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Open-File Report 2012–1024–B

Geologic Framework for the National Assessment of Carbon Dioxide Storage Resources—Powder River Basin, Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota, and Nebraska

By William H. Craddock, Ronald M. Drake, II, John C. Mars, Matthew D. Merrill, Peter D. Warwick, Madalyn S. Blondes, Mayur A. Gosai, Philip A. Freeman, Steven M. Cahan, Christina A. DeVera, and Celeste D. Lohr

Chapter B of
Geologic Framework for the National Assessment of Carbon Dioxide Storage Resources

Edited by Peter D. Warwick and Margo D. Corum

Thumbnail of and link to report PDF (10.5 MB)Abstract

This report presents ten storage assessment units (SAUs) within the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota, and Nebraska. The Powder River Basin contains a thick succession of sedimentary rocks that accumulated steadily throughout much of the Phanerozoic, and at least three stratigraphic packages contain strata that are suitable for CO2 storage. Pennsylvanian through Triassic siliciclastic strata contain two potential storage units: the Pennsylvanian and Permian Tensleep Sandstone and Minnelusa Formation, and the Triassic Crow Mountain Sandstone. Jurassic siliciclastic strata contain one potential storage unit: the lower part of the Sundance Formation. Cretaceous siliciclastic strata contain seven potential storage units: (1) the Fall River and Lakota Formations, (2) the Muddy Sandstone, (3) the Frontier Sandstone and Turner Sandy Member of the Carlile Shale, (4) the Sussex and Shannon Sandstone Members of Cody Shale, and (5) the Parkman, (6) Teapot, and (7) Teckla Sandstone Members of the Mesaverde Formation. For each SAU, we discuss the areal distribution of suitable CO2 reservoir rock. We also characterize the overlying sealing unit and describe the geologic characteristics that influence the potential CO2 storage volume and reservoir performance. These characteristics include reservoir depth, gross thickness, net thickness, porosity, permeability, and groundwater salinity. Case-by-case strategies for estimating the pore volume existing within structurally and (or) stratigraphically closed traps are presented. Although assessment results are not contained in this report, the geologic information included herein will be employed to calculate the potential storage space in the various SAUs.

First posted October 31, 2012

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Health & Environment
12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
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USGS ERP: Geologic CO2 Sequestration

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Suggested citation:

Craddock, W.H., Drake, R.M., II, Mars, J.C., Merrill, M.D., Warwick, P.D., Blondes, M.S., Gosai, M.A., Freeman, P.A., Cahan, S.M., DeVera, C.A., and Lohr, C.D., 2012, Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources—Powder River Basin, Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota, and Nebraska, chap. B of Warwick, P.D., and Corum, M.D., eds., Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2012–1024–B, 30 p.



Contents

Editors’ Preface

References Cited

Abstract

Introduction

Minnelusa and Tensleep Sandstones SAU C50330101

Crow Mountain Sandstone SAU C50330102

Lower Sundance Formation SAU C50330103

Fall River and Lakota Formations SAU C50330104

Muddy Sandstone SAU C50330105

Frontier Sandstone and Turner Sandy Member SAU C50330106

Sussex and Shannon Sandstone Members SAU C50330107

Parkman, Teapot, and Teckla Sandstone Members SAUs C50330108, C50330109, and C50330110/p>

Acknowledgments

References Cited


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