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U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1760-D

Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, 2007

The January 2006 Volcanic-Tectonic Earthquake Swarm at Mount Martin, Alaska

By James P. Dixon and John A. Power

ABSTRACT

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On January 8, 2006, a swarm of volcanic-tectonic earthquakes began beneath Mount Martin at the southern end of the Katmai volcanic cluster. This was the first recorded swarm at Mount Martin since continuous seismic monitoring began in 1996. The number of located earthquakes increased during the next four days, reaching a peak on January 11. For the next two days, the seismic activity decreased, and on January 14, the number of events increased to twice the previous day’s total. Following this increase in activity, seismicity declined, returning to background levels by the end of the month. The Alaska Volcano Observatory located 860 earthquakes near Mount Martin during January 2006. No additional signs of volcanic unrest were noted in association with this earthquake swarm.

The earthquakes in the Mount Martin swarm, relocated using the double difference technique, formed an elongated cluster dipping to the southwest. Focal mechanisms beneath Mount Martin show a mix of normal, thrust, and strike-slip solutions, with normal focal mechanisms dominating. For earthquakes more than 1 km from Mount Martin, all focal mechanisms showed normal faulting. The calculated b-value for the Mount Martin swarm is 0.98 and showed no significant change before, during, or after the swarm.

The triggering mechanism for the Mount Martin swarm is unknown. The time-history of earthquake occurrence is indicative of a volcanic cause; however, there were no low-frequency events or observations, such as increased steaming associated with the swarm. During the swarm, there was no change in the b-value, and the distribution and type of focal mechanisms were similar to those in the period before the anomalous activity. The short duration of the swarm, the similarity in observed focal mechanisms, and the lack of additional signs of unrest suggest this swarm did not result from a large influx of magma within the shallow crust beneath Mount Martin.

Front cover: Landsat image of Katmai National Park, Alaska, August 16, 2000.

First posted August 5, 2009

For additional information:
AVO Staff, Alaska Volcano Observatory
U.S. Geological Survey
4210 University Dr.
Anchorage, AK 99508
http://avo.alaska.edu/

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Suggested citation:

Dixon, J.P., and Power, J.A., 2009, The January 2006 volcanic-tectonic earthquake swarm at Mount Martin, Alaska, in Haeussler, P.J., and Galloway, J.P., eds., Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, 2007: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1760-D, 17 p.



Contents

Abstract

Introduction

Geologic Setting

Instrumentation

Seismicity

January 2006 Mount Marin Earthquake Swarm

Discussion and Conclusions

References


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