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Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Ground Water and Finished Water of Community Water Systems near Dayton, Ohio, 2002–04

U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2007–5035

By Mary Ann Thomas


This report is available below as a 19-page PDF for viewing and printing.


Abstract

Source water for 15 community-water-system (CWS) wells in the vicinity of Dayton, Ohio, was sampled to evaluate the occurrence of 258 anthropogenic compounds (AOCs). At least one AOC was detected in 12 of the 15 samples. Most samples contained a mixture of compounds (average of four compounds per sample). The compounds that were detected in more than 30 percent of the samples included three volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (trichloroethene, chloroform, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane) and four pesticides or pesticide breakdown products (prometon, simazine, atrazine, and deethylatrazine). In general, VOCs were detected at higher concentrations than pesticides were; among the VOCs, the maximum detected concentration was 4.8 µg/L (for trichloroethene), whereas among the pesticides, the maximum detected concentration was 0.041 µg/L (for atrazine).

During a later phase of the study, samples of source water from five CWS wells were compared to samples of finished water associated with each well. In general, VOC detections were higher in finished water than in source water, primarily due to the occurrence of trihalomethanes, which are compounds that can form during the treatment process. In contrast, pesticide detections were relatively similar between source- and finished-water samples.

To assess the human-health relevance of the data, concentrations of AOCs were compared to their respective human-health benchmarks. For pesticides, the maximum detected concentrations were at least 2 orders of magnitude less than the benchmark values. However, three VOCs—trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride, and tetrachloromethane—were detected at concentrations that approach human-health benchmarks and therefore may warrant inclusion in a low-concentration, trends monitoring program.

Contents

Foreward

Abstract

Introduction

Description of Study Area

Study Methods

Well Selection

Sample Collection, Analysis, and Quality Control

Interpretation of Results in a Human-Health Context

Anthropogenic Organic Compounds in Ground Water During Phase 1

Volatile Organic Compounds

Pesticides

Comparison of Ground Water and Finished Water During Phase 2

Volatile Organic Compounds

Pesticides

Summary

Acknowledgments

References Cited

Glossary

Appendix 1. Comparison of anthropogenic organic compounds detected in source- and associated finished water samples during Phase 2 of the Source Water-Quality Assessment near Dayton, Ohio.

Figures

  1. Map showing location of National Water-Quality Assessment Study Units and Ground-Water Source Water-Quality Assessments.
  2. Map showing location of wells sampled for the Source Water-Quality Assessment near Dayton, Ohio, 2002–04.
3–5. Graphs showing:
3. Concentrations, number of detections, and benchmark quotient values for volatile organic compounds and pesticides for
    samples collected during Phase 1 from 15 source-water wells of community water systems near Dayton, Ohio.
4. Comparison of volatile organic compounds in samples collected during Phase 2 from five source-water wells and the
    associated finished water of community supply systems near Dayton, Ohio: concentrations and benchmark quotient values.
5. Comparison of pesticides in samples collected during Phase 2 from five source-water wells and the associated finished water
    of community water systems near Dayton, Ohio: concentrations and benchmark quotient values.

Tables

1. Selected characteristics of 15 community-water-system wells sampled during Phase 1 of the Source Water-Quality Assessment
    near Dayton, Ohio.
2. Maximum concentration, detection frequency, and maximum benchmark quotient for regulated and unregulated compounds
    detected in samples collected during Phase 1 from 15 source-water wells of community water systems near Dayton, Ohio.
3. Maximum concentration, detection frequency, and maximum benchmark quotient for regulated and unregulated compounds
    detected in samples collected during Phase 2 from five source-water wells and the associated finished water of community
    water systems near Dayton, Ohio.


Availability

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Whole report (1.38 MB) - 19 pages (8.5" by 11" paper)


Suggested Citation:

Thomas, M.A., 2007, Anthropogenic organic compounds in ground water and finished water of community water systems near Dayton, Ohio, 2002–04: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2007–5035, 19 p.




For more information about USGS activities in Ohio, visit the USGS Ohio Water Science Center home page.




U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Persistent URL: http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2007/5035
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