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A FIELD CONFERENCE ON IMPACTS OF COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

by

Romeo M. Flores,  Gary D. Stricker,  Joseph F. Meyer, Thomas E. Doll, 
Pierce H. Norton, Jr.,  Robert J.  Livingston, and  M. Craig Jennings

Digital products by Scott Kinney,  Heather Mitchell,  and Steve Dunn
 
 
 

Open-File Report 01-126

2001
 
 
 
 


This report is preliminary and has not been reviewed for conformity with the U.S. Geological Survey editorial standards or with the North American Stratigraphic Code.  Any use of trade names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Image of Book Cover Page

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1. Map showing the routes and stops for the field conference in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, and BLM Environmental Impact Statement (BLM/EIS) project area boundary.
 
 

Figure 2. Tertiary geological map of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana showing the axis of the basin and BLM/EIS project area boundary.
 
 

Figure 3. Generalized stratigraphic column of the Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary rock units in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming.Modified from Laudon and others (1976).
 
 

Figure 4. Map showing subsurface mineral ownership in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana.
 
 

Figure 5.Map showing the locations of permitted CBM wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana and CBM fields in the southern part of Campbell County, Wyoming.
 
 

Figure 6.Composite stratigraphic column of the Fort Union Formation and associated rock units in the Powder River Basin.  Adapted from Flores and others (1999).
 
 

Figure 7.Map showing locations of regional stratigraphic cross sections of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and associated CBM producing coal beds and zones in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana.  Adapted from Flores and others (1999).
 
 

Figure 8. North-south cross section (B-B) of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and associated CBM producing coal beds and zones (e.g., Big George) along the western part of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana.  Adapted from Flores and others (1999).
 
 

Figure 9. North-south cross section (A-A) of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and associated CBM producing coal beds and zones (e.g.,Wyodak-Anderson) along the eastern part of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming.  Adapted from Flores and others (1999).
 
 

Figure 10. East-west cross section (D-D and) of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and associated CBM producing coal beds and zones (e.g., Wyodak-Anderson) along the south-central part of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Adapted from Flores and others (1999).
 
 

Figure 11.East-west cross section (C-C) of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and associated CBM producing coal beds and zones (e.g., Wyodak-Anderson) along the north-central part of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Adapted from Flores and others (1999).
 
 

Figure 12. Map showing the thickness of the overburden or rocks above the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone in the Powder River Basin.  Adapted from Ellis and others (1999).
 
 

Figure 13. Map showing the trend of historical CBM development from 1976 to 2000 along the eastern part of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming.
 
 

Figure 14. Graph showing the trends of CBM production from January, 1990 to October, 2000 in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming.  Total gas production includes Federal, State, and Private leases (graph provided by Fred Crockett).
 
 

Figure 15.Graph showing the number of CBM producing wells from January 1990 to October, 2000 in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming (graph provided by Fred Crockett).
 
 

Figure 16.Graph showing the depth range of CBM producing wells from January 1990 to October, 2000 in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming (graph provided by Fred Crockett).
 
 

Figure 17. Graph showing the trends of co-produced water from January, 1990 to October, 2000 in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming.Total co-produced water includes Federal, State, and Private leases (graph provided by Fred Crockett).
 
 

Figure 18. Maximum modeled drawdown of groundwater in the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone from 1975-2015 in the eastern part of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming.Modified from Bureau of Land Management (1999).
 
 

Figure 19. Map showing the watersheds, creeks, and rivers in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana (map provided by Joe Meyer).
 
 

Figure 20. Map showing SAR values in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming (data from Rice and others, 2000).
 
 

Figure 21. Map showing locations of 18 coal mines in the Gillette coalfield along the eastern margin of the Powder River Basin.
 
 

Figure 22. Map showing the mine permit boundary and strip pits of the Jacobs Ranch Coal Company (map provided by Rob Livingston).
 
 

Figure 23. A photograph of the mine highwall in Jacobs Ranch strip pit 1 showing the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone in the lower part and overlying fluvial deposits (photograph provided by Rob Livingston).
 
 

Figure 24. Map showing the locations of CBM wells and pipeline infrastructure in the Dry Fork, Greater Black Thunder, and Little Thunder CBM fields southeast of Wright, Wyoming (map provided by Tom Doll).
 
 

Figure 25.Map showing locations of CBM, oil, gas, and coal wells between Wright and Jacobs Ranch-Black Thunder coal mines.Cross section (A-B) is shown in Figure 26 (map provided by Al Ochs).
 
 

Figure 26.East-west cross section (A-B) showing the vertical and lateral stratigraphic variations of the CBM-producing Wyodak-Anderson coal zone and related fluvial deposits of the Fort Union Formation from Jacobs Ranch coal mine to south of Wright (cross section provided by Al Ochs).
 
 

Figure 27.Map showing the net coal thickness isopach of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. Adapted from Ellis and others (1999).
 
 

Figure 28. Map showing the net coal thickness isopach of coal beds deeper than the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana (map provided by Margaret Ellis).
 
 

Figure 29. Map showing the thickness of the overburden or rocks above the coal beds deeper than the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone in the Powder River Basin (map provided by Margaret Ellis).
 
 

Figure 30.A photograph of a truck mounted rig used by gas developers for shallow drilling of the Fort Union coal beds in the Powder River Basin.
 
 

Figure 31.Map showing the network of pipelines and locations of producing wells in the Gap gas gathering complex of Bear Paw Energy (map provided by Pierce Norton).
 
 

Figure 32. Map showing the major (16, 20, and 24 inches in diameter) pipeline infrastructure in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana (map provided by Pierce Norton).
 
 

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1. Chemical composition of co-produced water in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming.Data from Rice and others (2000).

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U. S. Geological Survey Open File Report 01-126

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