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Open-File Report 02-391

Multibeam Bathymetry and Selected Perspective Views of Main Part of Glacier Bay, Alaska

Selected Perspective Views

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All images linked to below are between 136 kb in size 178 kb

Click on the arrows within the index map below, or click on the thumbnail images below the index map to view the perspective images.

location map with arrows showing location of perspective images 8 7 6 4 5 3 2 1

Thumbnails

Entrance to Glacier Bay perspective

1

View of the entrance to Glacier Bay looking northerly. The terminus of the Little Ice Age glacier was at this approximate location in 1794 when Vancouver's exploration discovered the glacier (see Fig 1; sheet 1). Linear gouges (A) are likely caused by icebergs grounded on the coarse bottom sediment of Sitakaday Narrows (see Fig 2; sheet 1). The bergs were pushed through the Narrows by tidal currents that reach speeds up to 7 knots. The distance across the bottom of the image is about 4.5 km (2.8 miles) with 2x vertical exaggeration.Larger View, JPEG (143 kb)
Sitakaday narrows west perspective view2
Sitakaday Narrows viewed from southwest to northeast showing a bedrock knob (A) off Rush Point (B). Iceberg wallow pits (C) and gouges (Fig1) (D) show changes in travel path and bottom clearance of icebergs due to tidal current effects. The wallow pits can be as deep as 5 m (16 ft), while the gouges can be as deep as 2.5 m (8 ft). Strawberry (E) and Young (F) Islands are east of the Narrows. The distance across the bottom of the image is about 2.5 km (1.5 miles) with 2x vertical exaggeration.Larger View, JPEG (160 kb)
Link to Glacier Bay Main Passage JPEG3
View of Glacier Bay looking northwest over Strawberry Island (A) and Glacier Bay main passage (B). Iceberg gouges (C) turn the corner around Strawberry Island and bend southwest toward the main passage. The distance across the bottom of the image is about 4.5 km (6.1 miles) with 2x vertical exaggeration.Larger View, JPEG (154 kb)

Link to South Sitakaday Narrows JPEG

4

View looking south from over Willoughby Island toward Sitakaday Narrows (A). The entrance to Glacier Bay at Icy Strait (B) is in the distance. Iceberg wallow pits can be seen at (C), while ice gouges (D) extend south through and beyond Sitakaday Narrows. A bedrock knob (E) on the west side of the Narrows shoals to about 6 m (20 ft). Strawberry (F) and Young (G) Islands are on the east side of the Narrows. The distance across the bottom of the image is about 5 km (3.1 miles) with 2x vertical exaggeration.Larger View, JPEG (136 kb)

Marble Island

5

View looking northwest over North (A) and South (B) Marble Islands. These islands are part of a bedrock high (C) that runs northwest to southeast within Glacier Bay. Glacier Bay main passage (D) is to the west of the bedrock high, while Beartrack Cove deep (E) is to the east. The opening to the north (F) is the entrance to the West Arm of Glacier Bay (see Fig 1; sheet 1). The distance across the bottom of the image is about 3.5 km (2.2 miles) with 2x vertical exaggeration. Larger View, JPEG (165 kb)

Link to Northern Whidbey Passage JPEG

6

View looking southeast down the main part of Glacier Bay. The two islands in the center are Drake (A) and Willoughby (B) Islands. Whidbey Passage (C) runs between Drake Island and the mainland and extends south along Willoughby Island. The Main Passage (D) runs east of Drake Island. Whidbey Passage is a glacially carved passage that varies in water depth from 95 m to 170 m (310 ft to 560 ft) along its axis, while the main passage varies in water depth from 250 m to 350 m (820 ft to 1150 ft) along its axis in this image. A glacier terminus was located near Willoughby Island in the mid 1800's (see Fig 1; sheet 1). The distance across the bottom of the image is about 5 km (3.1 miles) with 2x vertical exaggeration. Larger View, JPEG (155 kb)

Link to Western Arm JPEG

7

View looking easterly from the West Arm of Glacier Bay. A bedrock high (A) extends northwest from the Marble Islands (B). The slope at C to C' drops from about 100 m to 325 m (328 ft to 1070 ft). A part of Drake Island (D) marks the west side of the main passage. The distance across the bottom of the image is about 3.3 km (2.0 miles) with 2x vertical exaggeration. Larger View, JPEG (178 kb)

Link to lower end of West Arm JPEG

8

View looking south from the entrance of West Arm of Glacier Bay. The two prominent bedrock highs in the foreground are Geike Rock (A) and Lone Island (B). The two islands toward the south are Drake (C) and Willoughby (D) Islands. The terminus of the Little Ice Age glacier was at the approximate location of (E) in the 1860's (see Fig 1: sheet 1). The distance across the bottom of the image is about 10 km (6.2 miles) with 2x vertical exaggeration. Larger View, JPEG (168 kb)
 
 

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