Relation between the Relative Abundance and Collapse of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and Microbial Antagonism in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

FEMS Microbiology Ecology
By: , and 

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Abstract

Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA) is the dominant filamentous cyanobacterium that develops into blooms in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon each year. During AFA bloom and collapse, ecosystem conditions for endangered Lost River and shortnose suckers deteriorate, thus motivating the need to identify processes that limit AFA abundance and decline. Here we investigate the relations between AFA and other members of the microbial community (photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic bacteria and archaea), how those relations impact abundance and collapse of AFA, and the types of microbial conditions that suppress AFA. We found significant spatial variation in AFA relative abundance during the 2016 bloom period using 16S rRNA sequencing. The Pelican Marina (PM) site had the lowest AFA relative abundance, and this was coincident with increased relative abundance of Candidatus Sericytochromatia, Flavobacterium, and Rheinheimera, some of which are known AFA antagonists. The AFA collapse coincided with phosphorus limitation relative to nitrogen and the increased relative abundance of Cyanobium and Candidatus Sericytochromatia, which outcompete AFA when dissolved inorganic nitrogen is available. The data collected in this study indicate the importance of dissolved inorganic nitrogen combined with microbial community structure in suppressing AFA abundance.

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Relation between the Relative Abundance and Collapse of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and Microbial Antagonism in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon
Series title FEMS Microbiology Ecology
DOI 10.1093/femsec/fiae043
Edition Online First
Year Published 2024
Language English
Publisher Oxford Academic
Contributing office(s) WMA - Laboratory & Analytical Services Division
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